TEACHING to CHANGE the WORLD
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  ABOUT THE AUTHORS
  Jeannie Oakes
  Martin Lipton
  Lauren Anderson
  Jamy Stillman
  About the Authors

Jeannie OakesJeannie Oakes is Presidential Professor (Emerita) in Educational Equity at UCLA’s Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, where she was the founding director of UCLA’s Institute for Democracy, Education, and Access and the University of California’s All Campus Consortium on Research for Diversity. Her more than one hundred scholarly books and articles examine the impact of social policies on the educational opportunities and outcomes of low-income students of color. One book, Keeping Track: How Schools Structure Inequality, has been honored as one of the twentieth century’s most influential books on education, and a second, Becoming Good American Schools: The Struggle for Civic Virtue in Education Reform (with Karen Hunter Quartz, Steve Ryan, and Martin Lipton), won the American Educational Research Association’s Outstanding Book Award. Oakes’s many other honors include the Southern Christian Leadership Conference’s Ralph David Abernathy Award for Public Service, the World Cultural Council’s Jose Vasconcelos World Award in Education, and membership in the National Academy of Education. Oakes began her career in education as a middle school and high school teacher. Currently, she is the Director of Educational Opportunity and Scholarship at the Ford Foundation in New York.


Martin LiptonMartin Lipton is Communications Analyst at UCLA’s Institute for Democracy, Education, and Access. A former public high school teacher, Lipton has had a parallel career as education writer and consultant. Among his publications are Learning Power: Organizing for Education and Justice, with Jeannie Oakes and John Rogers, and Becoming Good American Schools: The Struggle for Civic Virtue in Education Reform, with Jeannie Oakes, Karen Hunter Quartz, and Steve Ryan. Lipton’s photographs, appearing in this book and elsewhere, portray the possibilities for educational justice in urban communities.

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Lauren AndersonLauren Anderson is an assistant professor at the University of Southern California’s Rossier School of Education, where she teaches in the masters and doctoral programs. A former upper-elementary teacher and support provider for K–6 public school teachers, Lauren has lived, worked, and done research in the country’s three biggest urban school districts: New York City, Chicago, and Los Angeles. Lauren’s research collaborations focus on the preparation and early- career experiences of equity-minded teachers and principals. She has written for a number of educational journals and served as a coauthor for the book Making a Difference: Developing Meaningful Careers in Education (with Karen Hunter Quartz, Brad Olsen, and Kimberly Barraza Lyons).

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Jamy StillmanJamy Stillman is an assistant professor at the University of Southern California, Rossier School of Education. A former bilingual elementary teacher, she has worked as a support provider to public school teachers of English Learners for more than ten years. She has also worked as a teacher educator and conducted research on teacher education in California and New York, in both urban and rural settings. Jamy’s research and teaching focus primarily on the preparation of teachers to serve diverse learners, with an emphasis on how schools and teachers can effectively meet the needs of English Learners. She has published several book chapters and a number of articles in educational journals that explore the relationship between teacher learning, language and literacy instruction, and teachers’ navigation of educational policies.

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